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Books -- what are we reading lately?


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Two weeks ago I finally finished Tolstoy's magnum opus - the epic War and Peace. Its plot is mainly concerned with Napoleon's war against Russia at the beginning of the 19th century and two aristocrat

I have recently been switching back and forth between Clive Cussler and Stuart Woods. Both have good books and some not as good. Kind of like Dean Koontz. I read my Kindle every night and listen to Au

First I'm supposed to have said I downloaded a version when I didn't and haven't.......Then called a Wuss... when I'm not......and declared a regular at the wonderful Cherry bar.....When I've only bee

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“There is something spiteful and yet open-hearted about you”

― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

Shouldn't you be at Cherry Bar about now?

 

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Recently I finished The Karamazov Brothers by Doestoevsky. It was brilliant - an absolute masterpiece of writing. No wonder this is considered by many to be his magnum opus. I really enjoyed Crime and Punishment and felt before I read this that it would have to be exceptionally good to surpass that but it did and I highly recommend it, it's one of the best books I've read.

 

 

Hi

 

I think his best is "Crime and Punishment".

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It's "The Brothers Karamazov", always has been in the English translation.

 

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Can be both.

 

 

But somehow.......'The Karamazov Brothers' has more of a er........er..Bonanza feel

 

I was only going on the strength of my copy.

20160731_123004.jpg

 

Considering the syntax of the Russian language and its translation into English it could be translated both ways but I prefer the surname first.

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I was only going on the strength of my copy.

attachicon.gif20160731_123004.jpg

 

Considering the syntax of the Russian language and its translation into English it could be translated both ways but I prefer the surname first.

 

 

Yes, and in Spanish is that 'San Miguel Special'.....or 'Special San Miguel'?

 

I'm sure Jacko will have it in large print.

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Shouldn't you be at Cherry Bar about now?

 

Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk

 

First I'm supposed to have said I downloaded a version when I didn't and haven't.......Then called a Wuss... when I'm not......and declared a regular at the wonderful Cherry bar.....When I've only been there 3 times in it's existence. I'm not allowed out at night!

 

Maybe I'm being confused with Atlas or atlas3?...Easily done!

 

Now MM, 'Our Mutual Friend', will have read, or seen 'The Prince and the Pauper'....'The Third man'.....Hopefully read 'The Mating Season' by PGW.....Certainly 'Royal Flash' and they all have in common a theme of? (Yes you all got it), 'mistaken identity'....I'm not trying to 'Stoop to Conquer' here........But it's all just been a 'Comedy of Errors'

 

 

I'm gonna have to read this bloody book now.... ain't I ?

 

But first I'm sneaking downstairs to 'Switch-Bitch'......Now which finger am I supposed to put the band-aid on?

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Yes, and in Spanish is that 'San Miguel Special'.....or 'Special San Miguel'?

 

Yes it's good stuff. :chogdee2

 

But first I'm sneaking downstairs to 'Switch-Bitch'......Now which finger am I supposed to put the band-aid on?

Funnily enough I have a few of Roald Dahl's books on my reading list including Switch Bitch. I bought copies of Tales of the Unexpected and My Uncle Oswald recently.

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The way in which I carefully select the books that I put on my reading list, based mainly on my own research but also on recommendations means that I am having a great run of books that I would rate as nine and ten out of ten. I have just read three fantastic books in quick succession that I would all rate highly and recommend. They are:

 

Fear by L. Ron Hubbard

 

A psychological horror that was both thrilling and gripping with a clever twist at the end. This is one of the greatest science fiction books ever written and often makes lists of the greatest books ever written.

 

Paddy Clarke ha ha ha by Roddy Doyle

 

This is brilliant and one of the most compelling books I've read for a while. It's about a ten year old boy and the narrative is written from his perspective. It encapsulates childhood perfectly, the innocence, thought processes, fears, sadness and joy that you experience at that age. It's absolute genius and I can understand why it won the Booker prize.

 

Post Office by Charles Bukowski

 

Proof that you don't need an extensive vocabulary or the ability to use sophisticated metaphors and similes to write a good story. Bukowski has a simplistic writing style but one that is interesting enough to keep you reading. This is an autobiographical novel about his life working for the United States Postal Service (BigD have you read this? I should imagine you have met Charles Bukowski? :D) and how he juggles his working life around his alcoholism and passion for horse racing and gambling. It's an excellent story which is highly amusing at times as he drifts from place to place drinking heavily and womanising, written with an acerbic humour and a cynical perception of the world. It's great stuff and I think I'm going to check out some of his poetry next.

Edited by Siam Sam
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The way in which I carefully select the books that I put on my reading list, based mainly on my own research but also on recommendations means that I am having a great run of books that I would rate as nine and ten out of ten. I have just read three fantastic books in quick succession that I would all rate highly and recommend. They are:

 

Fear by L. Ron Hubbard

 

A psychological horror that was both thrilling and gripping with a clever twist at the end. This is one of the greatest science fiction books ever written and often makes lists of the greatest books ever written.

 

Paddy Clarke ha ha ha by Roddy Doyle

 

This is brilliant and one of the most compelling books I've read for a while. It's about a ten year old boy and the narrative is written from his perspective. It encapsulates childhood perfectly, the innocence, thought processes, fears, sadness and joy that you experience at that age. It's absolute genius and I can understand why it won the Booker prize.

 

Post Office by Charles Bukowski

 

Proof that you don't need an extensive vocabulary or the ability to use sophisticated metaphors and similes to wrote a good story. Bukowski has a simplistic writing style but one that is interesting enough to keep you interested. This is a semi-autobiographical novel about his life working for the United States Postal Service (BigD have you read this? I should imagine you have met Charles Bukowski? :D) and how he juggles his working life around his alcoholism and his passion for horse racing and gambling. It's an excellent story which is highly amusing at times as he drifts from place to place drinking heavily and womanising, written with an acerbic humour and a cynical perception of the world. It's great stuff and I think I'm going to check out some of his poetry next.

 

 

Hi,

 

I like your picks. I have to read "Fear". Bukowski and Henry Miller are 2 great writers of the monger school. My life mirrors them both to a large extent. :banana :beer :party :drunk

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First I'm supposed to have said I downloaded a version when I didn't and haven't.......Then called a Wuss... when I'm not......and declared a regular at the wonderful Cherry bar.....When I've only been there 3 times in it's existence. I'm not allowed out at night!

 

Maybe I'm being confused with Atlas or atlas3?...Easily done!

 

Now MM, 'Our Mutual Friend', will have read, or seen 'The Prince and the Pauper'....'The Third man'.....Hopefully read 'The Mating Season' by PGW.....Certainly 'Royal Flash' and they all have in common a theme of? (Yes you all got it), 'mistaken identity'....I'm not trying to 'Stoop to Conquer' here........But it's all just been a 'Comedy of Errors'

 

 

I'm gonna have to read this bloody book now.... ain't I ?

 

But first I'm sneaking downstairs to 'Switch-Bitch'......Now which finger am I supposed to put the band-aid on?

Note to self: Don't joust with atlas2 when using a mobile.

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Hi,

 

I like your picks. I have to read "Fear". Bukowski and Henry Miller are 2 great writers of the monger school. My life mirrors them both to a large extent. :banana :beer :party :drunk

 

Yes I have The World of Sex on my reading list. Is it any good?

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If you have an e-reader, I highly recommend subscribing to BookBub for a weekly alert on free and discounted e-books that match your interest. It’s a good way to build up your e-book library. My problem is that I’ve downloaded more e-books than I can possibly read in my lifetime.

https://www.bookbub.com/home/

Currently, my favorite authors are Harlan Coben, Michael Connelly, and Joseph Wambaugh. I’ve read every novel that these three authors have written.

I recently finished Stephen King’s “11/22/63”. It’s a very long novel to read. The first 1/2 was a little slow, but the second 1/2 was so interesting that I couldn’t put the book down until I finished it. I believe it’s going to be made into a TV series.

For those who are or were in the military (especially during the Vietnam War era), Karl Marlantes “Matterhorn” is a fascinating read about combat leadership (or lack of it) during the Vietnam War. I’ve been told that it’s on the reading list or syllabus at the US Army and Naval War Colleges.

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The last time I posted here I had just finished Post Office by Charles Bukowski. I'm going to list the books I've read since then with a rating out of ten and a short review. Last year I decided I'm going to read some of my favourite books again.

 

The Damage Done by Warren Fellows

 

The third time I've read this. Brilliant stuff. About the convicted heroin smuggler Warren Fellows who served 12 years in the notorious Bang Kwang prison in Bangkok. The ultimate novel about prison and redemption. Highly recommended. Ten out of ten.

 

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

 

The second time I've read this. Absolutely fascinating. Essential reading if you have an inquisitive mind and a thirst for knowledge. I highly recommend this. Ten out of ten.

 

1984 by George Orwell

 

I've read this several times now. It's absolute class and I don't think I need to say too much about this because everyone knows it's one of the best novels ever written. It's one of my favourite novels. A work of pure genius and a literary masterpiece, everyone should read this book in their lifetime. Ten out of ten and highly recommended.

 

Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh

 

The second time I've read this. This is brilliant and one of my favourite Welsh novels. Welsh is one of my favourite contemporary writers and if you haven't read a book of his then this would be a good one to start with. Ten out of ten and highly recommended.

 

Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald

 

What a big disappointment this was after reading The Great Gatsby which I thought was brilliant. This is nowhere near as good in comparison. Some people see this as Fitzgerald's greatest work but I can't see it myself and can understand why it had such mixed reviews when it was released. He's clearly a talented writer but I found the plot to this rather stale. His sentence structure is frequently convoluted too which makes it hard to follow in places. I did however enjoy the main character's descent into alcoholism which resonated with me. Six out of ten.

 

 

Porno by Irvine Welsh

 

This is the sequel to Trainspotting and another book that I've already read. it seemed appropriate to read it again before I watched the recently released Trainspotting 2 movie which is based on this novel, although the plot of the film is very different to the book. I did however love the movie and it worked very well, with the decision to write a script with a different plot to the book a good one. This book is also excellent and as good as Trainspotting. I'm yet to read a Welsh novel that I didn't rate highly and I've only got two left to read. His novels are laugh out loud funny in so many places. His work resonates with me because many of the events that occur in his novels have happened in my own life. I think many are put off reading his books because much of them are written in a broad Edinburgh accent but my advice is to persevere because before long you will get into a rhythm and get used to the accent when you read. The pay off is worth it because his novels are exceptionally good and this guy is a literary genius in my opinion. Ten out of ten. Highly recommended but read Trainspotting first.

 

Women by Charles Bukowski

 

I'm so glad I discovered Bukowski last year. Man can I relate to this guy. I read Post Office last year which I enjoyed but this was way better. It's cynical, vulgar, crude and downright hilarious. No wonder they call this guy the "laureate of American lowlife." This guy had a real debauched existence and a sex life that would have put Casanova to shame. Great stuff and mongers will enjoy this. I've since read some of his poetry which is really good too. Ten out of ten and once more, highly recommended.

 

A Decent Ride by Irvine Welsh

 

The second to last novel Welsh has written. As always a great read and highly entertaining. It's a riotous tale that includes the usual dose of sex, violence and drug abuse you'd expect in a Welsh novel but with some more controversial elements such as incest and necrophilia thrown in for good measure. The plot is centred around the recurring character of "Juice" Terry Lawson who was also a protagonist in the Glue and Porno novels. Welsh's characters are genius because even though they are villains and reprobates they have a benevolence and charm that the reader warms to. Nine out of ten.

 

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

 

I read Lord Jim a few years ago and didn't rate it but I thought I'd give Conrad a second chance because people speak so highly of this novel. I recently watched Apocalypse Now again and until then had no idea it was based on this book. It's about a voyage up the Congo river to find the enigmatic Mr Kurtz, an ivory trader whom the narrator is obsessed with. It's set during the height of British imperialism in Africa and deals with the disturbing effects that exploitation had on African societies and the violent behaviour that induced in many. It's a great read and considered to be one of the best books ever written. Nine out of ten.

 

I'm currently 240 pages into War and Peace. I felt it was high time I read this epic literary classic.

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Elephant Company by Vicki Constantine Croke 2014

 

The story of Brit Billy Williams who went to Burma in 1920 to work in the teak trade and operated behind Japanese lines in WWII as part of Force 136.

 

The part of the world we all love, elephants, war and escape into India to avoid capture or death.

 

A fun read,

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Absolutely loved the movie Barfly, Mickey Rourke, Faye Dunaway which I believe was loosely based on the life of Charles Bukowski.

 

Yes, it is based on a period of his life. I watched it a few months ago but didn't think it was that good. There is another film about his life starring Matt Dillon called Factotum. I started watching it on Kodi a while ago but the stream kept failing after about twenty minute so I gave up on it.

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Yeah! I found another book in my library by John Burdett. This is the Bangkok 8 Bangkok Tattoo etc writer. This one is called The Bangkok Asset. Now a short while ago I read Vulture Peak and thought that he was going well away from what I love about his writing but it was an OK read if not up to the standard of the past. Asset was however dreadful! I had carted this book 10000 kilometers and sadly Burdett has lost all the fun and realism that he once had. So sad. OK, if you want to keep up to date with the doings of Sonchai Jitpleecheep, go ahead and read it but you have been warned.

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Yeah! I found another book in my library by John Burdett. This is the Bangkok 8 Bangkok Tattoo etc writer. This one is called The Bangkok Asset. Now a short while ago I read Vulture Peak and thought that he was going well away from what I love about his writing but it was an OK read if not up to the standard of the past. Asset was however dreadful! I had carted this book 10000 kilometers and sadly Burdett has lost all the fun and realism that he once had. So sad. OK, if you want to keep up to date with the doings of Sonchai Jitpleecheep, go ahead and read it but you have been warned.

 

I read Bangkok 8 a few years back, didn't go much on it at all so never read another of his.

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Hi,

 

Not read this book yet. It seems a book for the hour.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/PROPAGANDA-Edward-Bernays/dp/0970312598/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1490089081&sr=1-1&keywords=propaganda+edward+bernays

 

PROPAGANDA

by Edward Bernays

It should be studied in schools, both as a historical work and also to help arm young people against the assault of psychological warfare we are confronted with each time we walk down the high street, enter a supermarket, open a magazine or newspaper, turn on the TV or listen to the radio.

 

 

Bernays likes to point out the fact that we like to think that we are "free", but we are often led by the "experts": in business, in politics, in science, philosophy, ethics. The PR agent serves the interests of the minority who control the interests and habits of the masses (what Bernays calls the "invisible Government"), by using the media industry itself, without its exclicit knowledge.
He describes an example from the fashion industry that is so obvious, that one feels very stupid in not noticing it.

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Hi,

 

Not read this book yet. It seems a book for the hour.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/PROPAGANDA-Edward-Bernays/dp/0970312598/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1490089081&sr=1-1&keywords=propaganda+edward+bernays

 

PROPAGANDA

by Edward Bernays

It should be studied in schools, both as a historical work and also to help arm young people against the assault of psychological warfare we are confronted with each time we walk down the high street, enter a supermarket, open a magazine or newspaper, turn on the TV or listen to the radio.

 

 

Bernays likes to point out the fact that we like to think that we are "free", but we are often led by the "experts": in business, in politics, in science, philosophy, ethics. The PR agent serves the interests of the minority who control the interests and habits of the masses (what Bernays calls the "invisible Government"), by using the media industry itself, without its exclicit knowledge.

He describes an example from the fashion industry that is so obvious, that one feels very stupid in not noticing it.

 

I hope he also discusses media controlling narrative.

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