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jomtienguy

What's your opinion on dual pricing?

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 I don't subscribe to the notion that foreigners have more money or don't pay tax or if you don't have tge money, don't go. I am incensed that a mixed child pays different rates depending on which parent accompanied them to the ticket window. 

Do you willingly pay the dual prices or do you boycott? ūüáĻūüá≠¬†

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Sometimes I refuse but not always. For example, I have a monthly Apple music subscription that costs $9.99 from the US apple App store, but the same subscription costs 129 baht in apple's Thailand app store. 

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I grew up in a tourist area where discounts for locals were sometimes available, so I can live with the idea.  But while I might accept paying 100 baht instead of 75, 500 instead of 50 would be over the top nd I might well turn away.  Equally, if the price is included in a pre-paid group tour, I would have no way of knowing about any 2-tier pricing.

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Loved the fact that when I was in Cambodia and went to Angkor Wat my GF got in for free. Three days of tramping with a guide, interpreter and cultural teacher.

Sent from my CPH1941 using Tapatalk

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In my country people would go nuts with that and yet accept things like senior and child discounts, ladies day/night...

In the third world I can afford full price more than locals can so I wouldn't object. If I was in Europe and saw that I might grouse quietly. I doubt I would see it.

I have encountered it in the PI. It didn't bother me.Vive le difference.

 

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Agree with the above post.  It doesn’t bother me.  It usually isn’t that much and doesn’t happen that often.  I’ve made more money than most Thais (most westerners have) so can afford it.

Their country, their rules.  Get with the program or leave.

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Well considering i live here married to a Thai national i've got a massive problem with it, they can shove it where the sun don't shine and i refuse to pay it where it is enforced, some places have a very sensible attitude after wifey has a chat with them. Its not about the money for me, its the principle.......

Onwards and upwards, things can only get better lol

Edited by Pumpuynarak

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2 hours ago, Pumpuynarak said:

Well considering i live here married to a Thai national i've got a massive problem with it, they can shove it where the sun don't shine and i refuse to pay it where it is enforced, some places have a very sensible attitude after wifey has a chat with them. Its not about the money for me, its the principle.......

Onwards and upwards, things can only get better lol

I dont have a problem with it for tourists who are just visiting.  The facilities were built and maintained and paid for by the locals so a tourist paying extra is only fair.

But someone like yourself who is a permanent resident  should be treated as a Thai. 

My brother has lived in Thailand for 35 years, raised his family there and left the country for maybe 5 weeks in that time. His Thai is way better than his English and I'm pretty sure he pays the local rate for these things, he certainly did when we went to visit places when I was on holiday with him.

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Well considering i live here married to a Thai national i've got a massive problem with it, they can shove it where the sun don't shine and i refuse to pay it where it is enforced, some places have a very sensible attitude after wifey has a chat with them. Its not about the money for me, its the principle.......
Onwards and upwards, things can only get better lol
Your attitude is spot on. Thai officials won't know that you are to all intents a Thai resident. Let the lady do the negotiations. I have found that shutting up sometimes is the way to handle things. My experience with a traffic cop and MM's experience with DUI come to mind. If you have an advantage, use it.

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51 minutes ago, teelack said:

Your attitude is spot on. Thai officials won't know that you are to all intents a Thai resident. Let the lady do the negotiations. I have found that shutting up sometimes is the way to handle things. My experience with a traffic cop and MM's experience with DUI come to mind. If you have an advantage, use it.

Sent from my CPH1941 using Tapatalk
 

Absolutely  , took a GF to get her bike repaired , 1800 baht.  I should have hung back and let her deal with it , probably 300 baht.  Went to the Grand Palace with two girls .  My price  500 baht ,they were free but it was a very hot day and i got a free bottle of water . I asked for water for the girls, denied. They told me to continue on and an got water.    I have disappointed the police at the usual venues since i have a license, tax and insurance. To their credit a couple gave me a thumbs up and had a nice conversation. Teelack is dead on , i have a lawyer friend that i hope i never have to use but the first line of defense is your TG.  I remember arriving at the then Marriott. The TGF is half /out  in of the BBus.  arguing . "He is Farang" I said babe its onlly 5 baht. Had to put her on my shoulder and drag her home.   Did Roland ever get his 5 Baht back?

 

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GF sometimes talks me in for the Thai price pointing to my Thai DL.  Once, when it didn't work, the response was "He doesn't look Thai."

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6 hours ago, midlifecrisis said:

In my country people would go nuts with that and yet accept things like senior and child discounts, ladies day/night...

In the third world I can afford full price more than locals can so I wouldn't object. If I was in Europe and saw that I might grouse quietly. I doubt I would see it.

I have encountered it in the PI. It didn't bother me.Vive le difference.

 

^^^ Many years ago, in Mexico (TJ), local girl latched onto me.  All blah, blah, but said she was at uni studying to be a doctor, whatever...  But when we entered an authentic local Mexican restaurant (not Texmex) she would do the talking and get the local price for us both...  She claimed they would have charged me double...  (Menu and bill was in Spanish)

Guess dual pricing happens in all/most of third world like places...

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"The facilities were built and maintained and paid for by the locals so a tourist paying extra is only fair." 

Many of the places charging foreigners more are privately built and owned, eg Nong Nooch etc do locals paid nothing towards their building costs. 

"I grew  up in a tourist area where discounts for locals were sometimes available," 

Yes, me too but it was done to to encourage locals to bring visitors there not to discriminate. Also it was not available to EVERY ONE of the countrys nationality, as the Thais do

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9 hours ago, Pumpuynarak said:

Well considering i live here married to a Thai national i've got a massive problem with it, they can shove it where the sun don't shine and i refuse to pay it where it is enforced, some places have a very sensible attitude after wifey has a chat with them. Its not about the money for me, its the principle.......

Onwards and upwards, things can only get better lol

A fair point. I speak only from the pov of a tourist. Were I a resident or like like you married to a Thai it would be a different matter.

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6 hours ago, teelack said:

Your attitude is spot on. Thai officials won't know that you are to all intents a Thai resident. Let the lady do the negotiations. I have found that shutting up sometimes is the way to handle things. My experience with a traffic cop and MM's experience with DUI come to mind. If you have an advantage, use it.

Sent from my CPH1941 using Tapatalk
 

In the PI the lady I was with got annoyed at such a scheme once and stepped in to negotiate. It worked. 

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A few years ago my family came over,  wife and me, brother and his wife along with 6 of wifes family went to a little water falls park to have a picnic. At the gate the lady said 20 baht for Thai's and 120 for the foreigners, wife said he's my husband that's family, lady said but there foreigners. Wife said if they have to pay more them none of us is going in we'll go some where else, in no time she said OK OK 20 baht each. If everyone refuses to pay it, they will change it.

 

 

 

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17 hours ago, Olded said:

A few years ago my family came over,  wife and me, brother and his wife along with 6 of wifes family went to a little water falls park to have a picnic. At the gate the lady said 20 baht for Thai's and 120 for the foreigners, wife said he's my husband that's family, lady said but there foreigners. Wife said if they have to pay more them none of us is going in we'll go some where else, in no time she said OK OK 20 baht each. If everyone refuses to pay it, they will change it.

 

 

 

I've visited Phimai historical park on two occasions to take wifey and her mates, get to the entrance and they insist on me paying their tourist tax despite wifey explaining to them i live in Thailand and we are married, she shows them my DL and pink ID card, all to no avail so i sit in the aircon coffee bar just round the corner waiting for wifey and her mates to return. I have little interest in the place as AFAIC its just a pile of uninteresting rubble and the coffee was great lol

I have to say i've seen most of what i wanted to see when i was a tourist and i paid up accordingly but those times are now over and have been for some considerable time, either admit me at the local rate or shove it Thailand.

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On 10/25/2020 at 6:47 AM, midlifecrisis said:

In my country people would go nuts with that and yet accept things like senior and child discounts, ladies day/night...

In the third world I can afford full price more than locals can so I wouldn't object. If I was in Europe and saw that I might grouse quietly. I doubt I would see it.

I have encountered it in the PI. It didn't bother me.Vive le difference.

 

I saw dual pricing in Pompeii. So it does exist outside of Thailand.

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Dual pricing in Las Vegas at the golf courses. Locals pay half what visitors pay.

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3 hours ago, PigBoy#1 said:

Dual pricing in Las Vegas at the golf courses. Locals pay half what visitors pay.

At a municipal course, paid for by taxpayers, I could understand it but not at private courses. 

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42 minutes ago, midlifecrisis said:

At a municipal course, paid for by taxpayers, I could understand it but not at private courses. 

At public and semi private courses dual pricing. Have never played a fully private course in LV.

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37 minutes ago, PigBoy#1 said:

At public and semi private courses dual pricing. Have never played a fully private course in LV.

That's wrong.

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Dual pricing occurs in tourist areas all over the world- you may just not be aware of it because it isn't publicly posted.  The difference is that in a lot of places, the discount is based on residency, rather than nationality.  When I lived in Manhattan, my condo was situated in a neighborhood that also had many office buildings, hotels, shops, bars, restaurants, etc. where thousands and thousands of commuters worked and thousands of tourists stayed, ate and shopped.  Full-time  residents,  including non-U.S. citizens,  got ID cards from their landlords that entitled the holder to discounts with local merchants.  The dry cleaner in my building gave residents a 20% discount, the deli next door gave 10% and nearby bars the same. Most shops and restaurants in the area followed suit.

People who lived in a different area of NYC would pay the same prices as tourists from  Asia or Europe.  And I would pay the same price as tourists if I shopped or dined outside my part of the city.  Many attractions in the U.S., such as Disney World and even national parks, give locals a discount or even admit them for free.

Here's what I paid in July to use the Chesapeake Expressway, which is a stretch of highway of only 16 miles. It was over 10 times more than what a resident of Virginia would pay.

Chesapeake.gif

Only residents of Virginia with a Virginia driver's license are eligible for the discount member rate. They crank up the rate on weekends because thousands of tourists use the Chesapeake Expressway on their way to a major U.S. tourist destination, the Outer Banks in North Carolina. 

The big difference between the U.S. and Thai "dual pricing" is that in the U.S., it's based on local residency rather than nationality.  Non-U.S. citizens who live in Virginia can get the Expressway discount and the same applied to the "resident discount cards" in NYC neighborhoods.  It's illegal in the U.S. to give discounts or other favorable treatment solely on the basis of race or nationality, but it's OK to give discounts based on residency.

Evil

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2 hours ago, Evil Penevil said:

Dual pricing occurs in tourist areas all over the world- you may just not be aware of it because it isn't publicly posted.  The difference is that in a lot of places, the discount is based on residency, rather than nationality.  When I lived in Manhattan, my condo was situated in a neighborhood that also had many office buildings, hotels, shops, bars, restaurants, etc. where thousands and thousands of commuters worked and thousands of tourists stayed, ate and shopped.  Full-time  residents,  including non-U.S. citizens,  got ID cards from their landlords that entitled the holder to discounts with local merchants.  The dry cleaner in my building gave residents a 20% discount, the deli next door gave 10% and nearby bars the same. Most shops and restaurants in the area followed suit.

People who lived in a different area of NYC would pay the same prices as tourists from  Asia or Europe.  And I would pay the same price as tourists if I shopped or dined outside my part of the city.  Many attractions in the U.S., such as Disney World and even national parks, give locals a discount or even admit them for free.

Here's what I paid in July to use the Chesapeake Expressway, which is a stretch of highway of only 16 miles. It was over 10 times more than what a resident of Virginia would pay.

Chesapeake.gif

Only residents of Virginia with a Virginia driver's license are eligible for the discount member rate. They crank up the rate on weekends because thousands of tourists use the Chesapeake Expressway on their way to a major U.S. tourist destination, the Outer Banks in North Carolina. 

The big difference between the U.S. and Thai "dual pricing" is that in the U.S., it's based on local residency rather than nationality.  Non-U.S. citizens who live in Virginia can get the Expressway discount and the same applied to the "resident discount cards" in NYC neighborhoods.  It's illegal in the U.S. to give discounts or other favorable treatment solely on the basis of race or nationality, but it's OK to give discounts based on residency.

In Australia the 'residency' discounts are most often called 'loyalty' discounts and generally are with discounts given to those who regularly frequent those venues/companies. Close-by to me there are two towns where locals who are regulars at the local pubs (particularly during the 'down' season where tourists are not in town in any large numbers), show their cards, or are recognised as 'locals', and purchase drinks at discount prices. Fair enough, I reckon. Of course there are others who get discounts, based on their social and financial status, their age/financial status, or if  they are military veterans. Fair enough, too.

2 hours ago, Evil Penevil said:

Evil

 

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