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Displayed prices are for multiple nights. Check the site for price per night. I see hostels starting at 200b/day and hotels from 500b/day on agoda.
Chang_paarp

The rate on the street.

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13 hours ago, ozboy said:

I use ING bank and there debit card refunds overseas  ATM fees (though I haven't used this facility) though using the card in various countries for cash (debit) payments I tend to get a TINY bit better the TT currency rates without any fees.

My experience as well with a US card which covers fees for two ATM withdrawals a month.  The rate is withinin a few satang of thr TT rate, same when I use it for purchases.

Haven't had an ATM ask whether I wanted with conversion or without for several years.  Occasionally, a merchant will ask whether I want a purchase charged in USD or baht as they have the question on their screen.  Always baht.

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Close at the moment to dropping into the 37's with Sterling at a 27 month low against the Dollar. Boris with his intentions to force no deal is going to be catastrophic if it comes to pass

Nobody can be enjoying Thailand whatsoever at these rates unless money is no object and that goes for the Euros as well obviously

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Morgan Stanley are predicting parity with the dollar for the pound if there is a no deal brexit,tin hat time.

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2 hours ago, yselmike said:

Morgan Stanley are predicting parity with the dollar for the pound if there is a no deal brexit,tin hat time.

One at a time please, parity with the Euro first!

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6 hours ago, jacko said:

One at a time please, parity with the Euro first!

A race to the bottom then.

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It boggles the mind....currencies. Why should the Pound or Euro be valued higher than the dollar? Why should they all be losing against the THB? They are all based on nothing...

"The value of fiat money is derived from the relationship between supply and demand and the stability of the issuing government, rather than the worth of a commodity backing it."

 

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It boggles the mind....currencies. Why should the Pound or Euro be valued higher than the dollar? Why should they all be losing against the THB? They are all based on nothing...
"The value of fiat money is derived from the relationship between supply and demand and the stability of the issuing government, rather than the worth of a commodity backing it."
 
Surely the simple answer is supply and demand? There is more demand for instance for the Thai baht that many other currencies. It may not appear rational but it is the same principle as "Voting with your feet" in that you put your money into places that you like and withdraw it from places that you don't. Financiers are not sentimental so perhaps we need to believe that there are good reasons despite what seems apparent.


Sent from my Nokia 6.1 using Tapatalk

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2 hours ago, teelack said:

Surely the simple answer is supply and demand? There is more demand for instance for the Thai baht that many other currencies. It may not appear rational but it is the same principle as "Voting with your feet" in that you put your money into places that you like and withdraw it from places that you don't. Financiers are not sentimental so perhaps we need to believe that there are good reasons despite what seems apparent.


Sent from my Nokia 6.1 using Tapatalk
 

Countries can't force demand but they can decide how much currency is avilable.

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Just read this on Pattaya News. 

Thailand’s tourism minister has blamed a surge in the baht for sapping tourist arrivals into Southeast Asia’s second-largest economy and says he’ll take up the matter with the central bank, highlighting rising concern over the currency’s gains.

Arrivals have dropped because of the baht’s strength, Piphat Ratchakitprakarn, minister of tourism and sports, told reporters in Bangkok after he officially began his new role. Piphat said he’ll discuss with the Bank of Thailand and the finance minister what can be done to help support the industry.

“The strength of the baht is part of the reason why the number of tourists has dropped as those who come would get less money from their currencies to spend,” Piphat said on Thursday. “Tourism is considered to be one of our country’s main revenue drivers. I will do everything I can to make sure that arrivals increase and more revenue is generated than before.”

Piphat’s aim to boost the number of arrivals contrasts with the view from his predecessor, Weerasak Kowsurat, who said Thailand should care less about increasing of quantity of travelers and focus instead on improving sustainable tourism to mitigate environmental impacts caused by too many visitors.

Full report: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-07-18/world-beating-baht-is-a-big-big-headache-for-thailand-s-tourism

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Read and weep....  I know, it says Thursday again!

20190719_132951.jpg

 

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Financial markets dont seem to be too averse to Bonking Boris getting the hot seat in the UK

Cable is up as is Sterling/Euro very nicely. FTSE pretty flat. Seems as if hes clearly being given a chance

Edited by Rawhide2

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6 hours ago, Rawhide2 said:

Financial markets dont seem to be too averse to Bonking Boris getting the hot seat in the UK

Cable is up as is Sterling/Euro very nicely. FTSE pretty flat. Seems as if hes clearly being given a chance

Sterlign up against the greenback as well, doesn't seem to have filtered over to SEA yet but the kabayan remit rates are static at 63.5php to the £, baht holding at 38.26 according to the TT FB page.

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Kiwi is holding steady. Good for myself and Teelak for our trips next month.   Phew!!!

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13 hours ago, Butch said:

Sterlign up against the greenback as well, doesn't seem to have filtered over to SEA yet but the kabayan remit rates are static at 63.5php to the £, baht holding at 38.26 according to the TT FB page.

Yea apologies I wrote "Cable" from long term use (Sterling/Dollar is known as Cable)

At the moment Boris is making all the right noises. Make no mistake should Boris get a changed deal to satisfy most people Sterling will surge

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Well that went well lol. Sterling now diving quicker than some go down on bar girls. Maybe Jacko will put up TT photo but considering where Sterling finished Friday night its going to start with 37.xx

Interbank closed at its lowest since pre 1997 at 38.15

God alone knows what the airport cartel is at probably 35.xx

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On 7/27/2019 at 1:05 PM, Rawhide2 said:

Maybe Jacko will put up TT photo

Here ya go.....

20190728_115802.jpg

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28 minutes ago, jacko said:

Here ya go.....

20190728_115802.jpg

wow thats way higher than it normally is in relation to interbank at locked down weekend rates. Interbank is only 38.15. It wont be 38.03 tomorrow morning if interbank opens the same

Had a look at the weekend rates for Revolut just 37.35 prior to posting. Illiquid currency I know

Edited by Rawhide2

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21 hours ago, Rawhide2 said:

wow thats way higher than it normally is in relation to interbank at locked down weekend rates. Interbank is only 38.15. It wont be 38.03 tomorrow morning if interbank opens the same

Had a look at the weekend rates for Revolut just 37.35 prior to posting. Illiquid currency I know

It is a holiday weekend here, maybe that is affecting their updating.

King's birthday Sunday, bank holiday in lieu Monday.

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At the moment at time of post Interbank virtually unmoved at 38.17.

Revolut moved up to 37.77. I know at weekends they heavily mark down if you use their card in that period

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https://www.wsj.com/articles/swiss-central-bank-fires-warning-shot-on-currency-11564406799?mod=hp_lead_pos4

 

Swiss Central Bank Fires Warning Shot on Currency

Swiss franc strengthens as investors anticipate U.S. and European rate cuts

 
 
Weekly change in average sight deposits at the Swiss National BankSource: Refinitiv
.billion Swiss francs2017’18’19-2-10123456April 21, 2017x3.021 billion Swiss francs
By 
Paul J. Davies
 

The Swiss central bank appears to have taken its most significant steps to weaken the Swiss franc in two years, after looming rate cuts from U.S. and European central banks put upward pressure on the currency.

The Swiss National Bank began selling francs into the market last week, a move that was reflected in an uptick in the so-called sight deposits that lenders use to hold reserves at the central bank. The sight deposits, a closely watched indicator of foreign-exchange intervention, grew by 1.7 billion francs ($1.7 billion), which is the largest amount in about two years since summer 2017, according to analysts.

“This looks like intervention,” said Thomas Flury, global head of currency strategy at UBS Wealth Management. “It is the highest increase since the French election period in 2017, when they were last intervening.”

The Swiss National Bank declined to comment Monday.

How many Swiss francs €1 buysSource: Tullett PrebonNote: Value scale is inverted to reflect the strength ofthe franc against the euroAs of July 29, 10:30 a.m. ET
July ’17July ’18July ’191.0501.0751.1001.1251.1501.1751.2001.225Jul 14, 2017x1.1051

The Swiss franc hit what many analysts see as a key level last Wednesday, which is 1.10 francs per euro, a level it hasn’t breached since early July 2017. At the end of April, one euro bought 1.14 francs, while in May last year it was 1.20 francs.

Looser monetary policy in the U.S. and Europe puts upward pressure on the franc by making Swiss investments relatively more attractive, or less unattractive, by shrinking the difference in interest rates between the Alpine nation and elsewhere. Switzerland’s economy is typically viewed as strong and stable, making it a haven for investors.

The European Central Bank didn’t cut interest rates last week, but President Mario Draghi has been preparing the market for rate cuts and more bond buying in his recent speeches. He further emphasized that message in Thursday’s monetary policy statement.

 

The Swiss franc weakened after the ECB’s decision, but remains high compared with the recent past.

“Intervention has been a longtime coming, the franc has been rising in recent months,” said David Oxley, senior Europe economist at Capital Economics.

 

Data on Swiss sight deposits is publicly available only up to the middle of last week, so the central bank’s move came before the latest round of rate-signals from the ECB.

Mr. Oxley and other analysts said the recent fall in the franc looked more market driven than central bank driven.

im-93717?width=620&size=1.5
A market in front of the Swiss National Bank in Zurich. PHOTO: ARND WIEGMANN/REUTERS

JPMorgan analysts expect the franc to continue to strengthen, in part because the Swiss central bank wouldn’t want to be seen intervening and thereby attracting the ire of the U.S.

“President Trump’s ongoing forays into the FX market will further incline the SNB to sit on its hands and leave [the franc] unrestrained,” they said in a note Friday.

However, the central bank could have masked its intervention, but didn’t, according to UBS’s Mr. Flury.

“It could have done this via options and then we wouldn’t see it,” he said. “Maybe they wanted to show the market that they are around.”

Mr. Flury added that Switzerland could handle some further currency strengthening because on a fair-value basis—calculated using relative purchasing power—the franc is weaker against the euro than it was when the SNB last intervened to weaken the currency.

 

When the ECB does cut rates, Switzerland is likely to follow suit: a further quarter-point cut would take the Swiss policy rate to minus 1%.

—Brian Blackstone and Pat Minczeski contributed to this article.

Write to Paul J. Davies at paul.davies@wsj.com

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